ABOUT US

OUR DETAILS

The management of PM LEATHERS., have eminent professionals as promoters whose background is as under,

OUR COMPANY

Company Name: PM LEATHERS
Company Established: 2000
Company Founder: B. PEER MOHAMMED
NO. OF. Employees: 20
NO. OF. Machineries: 13

LIST OF MACHINERIES IN TANNERY

Autospray Machine
Auto Toggling Machine
Polishing Machine
Platting Machine
Finiflex Machine
Measuring Machine

LIST OF MACHINERIES IN GOODS SECTION

Die Cutting Machine
Skiving Machine
Flat Bed Stitching Machine
Cylinder Bed Stitching Machine
Folding Machine
Greasing Machine
Embossing Machine

1st GENERATION HISTORY OF PM LEATHERS

The Founder of this Company Mr. B. Peer Mohammed was Born in a Middle class Family. He was Worked in a Leather Tannery as a Supervisor in the Year 1974. Who has Gained Knowledge in Tanning and Finishing Process. Then who joined in another one biggest tannery as a Leather Technician of the Year 1990. He Left over his job In 1997 and who started a Company without own Building in the Name of PM LEATHERS.

OUR 1ST STEP INTO THE BUSINESS:

Our 1st Valuable customer is Bhartiya Fashions, Which Company is a Leather Products Exporting Company. This Company given Dyed Sheep Crust Leather Sheets for Nappalan Finishing. We achieved with our Quality, They are also Satisfied Very much; And regularly we given 5000sqft in a day by planning with someother Machinery Jobwork Companies. Totally we used 4 auto spray in different companies at same time to get 5000sqft output/ per day. Then we Constructed a Tannery Building in 2009. And Started our Production Here in our own building with Experienced Technicians and Helpers.

2ND GENERATION HISTORY OF PM LEATHERS

MR. MOHAMED ALI (L.Tech) Son of B.PEER MOHAMMED (Founder of PM LEATHERS). Mr. Mohamed Ali was Born in 1989. Who was Finished his Leather Technology Studies in the year 2012, Then He worked in a tannery as a Leather Technician for 3years. Mohamed Ali took over his Dad Business in 2015. And the Other Side who have started Leather Goods Exports with Very Well Experienced Pattern Master and Good Skilled and Semi Skilled Workers in his Tannery Building.

VARIETY OF LEATHERS

We are Tanning and Exporting Cow, Buff, Goat and Sheep Finished Leathers which is Suitable for Goods, Shoes and Garments.

GOODS PRODUCTS

We Are Manufacturing Mens Belt, Credit card holder, V.Card holder, Passport holder, Trifold wallets, BI-FOLD wallets, cheque book wallet, Dairy cover, Ladies sling bag, Clutches, Hand bags, Executive bags, Laptop bags, Etc...

ACHIEVEMENT

We are Exporting Leather Sheets and Leather Goods in wide Range to Every where since 2015.

GOAL

Quality means customer satisfication. Customer satisfaction is our goal.

STORY OF LEATHER

Leather tanning is without a doubt one of the oldest human activities. In the beginning, skins obtained from hunting and livestock breeding could be used for clothing or tents, but they became stiff at low temperatures, while they rotted with heat. It was probably then that attempts were made to render them more flexible and stronger by rubbing in animal fats, the first rudimental tanning process is mentioned in Assyrian texts and in Homers Iliad.

Another process was smoking, which almost certainly started by accident, and which later became formaldehyde tanning, as this substance is found in the vapors produced by burning green leaves and branches. It was soon discovered that the rotting process could also be stopped by drying, carried out by exposure to the sun or by the dehydrating action of salt. Vegetable tanning was also known in very ancient times although it is not clear how the tanning action of the tannin contained in the bark of some plants (especially oak) was discovered. Another method known since the earliest times is tanning, based on the use of alum, a mineral which is fairly widespread in nature, particularly in volcanic areas.

These methods, which gradually became more refined and efficient, allowed skins to be used in the ancient world and continued to do so for century after century up to the present day. That the use of these techniques was widespread is witnessed by numerous written documents and paintings as well as archaeological finds. In Mesopotamia between the fifth and the third millennium B.C., for example, the Sumerians used skins for long dresses and diadems for ladies. The Assyrians used leather for footwear but also for liquid containers and as inflated floats for rafts. The ancient Indian civilization first processed the type of leather known as the "Morocco" today.

The Egyptians also achieved considerable skill in processing leather, which they used for clothing (even for gloves), tools, arms or simply for ornament. The historian, Strabo, tells of an interesting use developed by Phoenicians who made water pipes from it. During Roman times, leather was widely used in all the provinces of the empire, and more efficient tanning techniques were introduced where they had not been developed locally.

The Romans used leather both for footwear and clothing and for making shields and harnesses. A tannery was uncovered amid the ruins of Pompei and the same equipment of the kind still in use for centuries thereafter was found in it.

Skipping forward to the 8th century of Spain (then under the dominion of the Moors) we have the development of the production of "Cordovan", thanks to important progress in tanning, a type of leather famous throughout Europe for centuries. That skill in leather tanning was not a prerogative of the western world as recounted by Marco Polo. In his "Travels" he tells us that the Mongols used leather flasks, covers, masks, and caps, decorated artistically, and it was him who coined the expression "Russia Leather" to indicate a type with a characteristic fragrance.


A considerable improvement in processing techniques occurred in the 12th century with the result being that between then and the last century, there were no substantial changes to tanning systems. Even oil tanning was used to produce protective garments while tawing was widespread although the results were not always satisfactory. Often, finishing operations were carried out to improve the malleability of the leather and improve its appearance, especially by dyeing. The products, though essentially practical, also met decorative requirements.

In the fourteenth century, for instance, leather was being used in combination with wood in chairs, arm-chairs, and settles with craftsmanship that reached the levels of an art-form. This was also the case later on with tapestries (especially in Venice in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries) with chests and cases, and of course, with book bindings, perhaps the most lasting and refined use of the material. Going back to tanning techniques, it is more or less in the Middle Ages that the depilating action of quick lime was discovered, a technique which is still valid and normally used today.

The Romans used leather both for footwear and clothing and for making shields and harnesses. A tannery was uncovered amid the ruins of Pompei and the same equipment of the kind still in use for centuries thereafter was found in it.

Skipping forward to the 8th century of Spain (then under the dominion of the Moors) we have the development of the production of "Cordovan", thanks to important progress in tanning, a type of leather famous throughout Europe for centuries. That skill in leather tanning was not a prerogative of the western world as recounted by Marco Polo. In his "Travels" he tells us that the Mongols used leather flasks, covers, masks, and caps, decorated artistically, and it was him who coined the expression "Russia Leather" to indicate a type with a characteristic fragrance.

A radical shake-up was provided in the middle of the last century with the discovery of the tanning power of chrome salts which led to a drastic improvement in production and was applied in practice in industrial production towards the end of the century. Another revolutionary element was the substitution of the tanning pit with the rotating drum, along with the discovery of new types of tannins.

As a result of all these innovations, the time required for tanning was shortened incredibly from eight months to a year, to a period of a few days today. But let us take a step back again to have a look at the system and tools that were once used to work leather. We immediately discover that from Palaeolithic times, almost to the present day, the processes and tools remained almost unchanged, gaining only in efficiency and comfort.

Similar tools for fleshing, scraping, shaving, perching, and trimming are found in practically every epoch known to us.

This is a further demonstration of the fact that leather tanning has gone hand in hand with the history of mankind, maintaining those features of "craftsmanship" which even today with increasing automation are an essential part of the personal sensibility and solid experience of those carry it on.

What is Leather?

Skins and hides are rarely used in their natural state as they are subject to rotting and temperature variations (hard and rigid when the temperature is low, soft and flaccid when it is high). The purpose of tanning is to eliminate these problems using suitable agents of animal, vegetable, mineral or synthetic origin.

Structure of the Hide

Starting from the outside, the skin (or hide) has three layers:

   Epidermis (1% of the total thickness)
   Dermis (85% of the thickness)
   The sub-cutaneous layer or "flesh" (14% of the thickness)

The epidermis and everything attached to it - hair, fur, follicles, sebaceous and sweat glands, horney, material etc. - is usually eliminated as it is not used except by furriers.

The "flesh", which is white connective sub-cutaneous tissue containing fat, is also removed. The dermis is processed to obtain the tanned hide or leather. It consists of bundles of connective fibers, made up of even smaller fibrils which are all interwoven to form a three-dimensional "mesh." It is very dense towards the surface (papillary layer) and less dense in thereticular layer.

There is a mass of cemented substances composed of a protein complex (globulin) between the fibers; the fibrils are composed of a protein called collagen which is of fundamental importance in the tanning process.

As a matter of curiosity, the total surface area of all the fibrils contained in just one gram of leathers in 50 square meters! The surface of the fibers collect and circulate the perspiration in the form of vapor and transfer it to the outer surface of the skin. This also occurs even if the skin is partly impermeable to water. Leather, in fact, is a unique material which prevents liquids from passing but not gases or vapors.

In tanning there is an important distinction between the upper part of the dermis (in contact with the epidermis, which makes up what is called grain leather and is characteristic of each different type of animal) and the part below (reticular layer) which is called the split.

Making Leather

Raw Materials

Raw hides arrive at the tannery preserved in salt. After a thorough examination is carried out to see if the skins are adequately kept and if they have the required characteristics processing begins by removing the salts.

Sammiering

The leather hides are run through a machine which presses the water out of the hides to a predetermined degree of moisture, getting them ready for splitting.

Dry Milling

At this stage the leather is loaded into dry vessels and milled to the required softness.

Liming

Skins are loaded into wooden vessels and rinsed in running water for approximately 24 hours and turned up to three minutes every half an hour. This is done to bring back the skin to its original condition. Lime and acids are then added to remove the hair from the skin. Approximately 24 hours later, the skins are washed again and ready for the next processing stage.

Splitting

The skins are inserted through a machine equipped with two cylinders in between which a sharp running blade is kept constantly sharp. The skins are horizontally split to a predetermined thickness evenly throughout the surface. The top layer also called Top Grain is then ready for trimming, shaving and dyeing.

Buffing

Hides are inserted through a machine equipped with an abrasive cylinder which removes the top surface of the leather. In corrected grain leathers, this operation is carried out to remove the various imperfections (scars, tick bites, brands, etc.) before a pigmented finish is applied. In Nubuk and Suede, buffing is done to achieve the classic velvety look.

Fleshing

Fleshing is the first mechanical operation carried on the skins. The hides are passed between two rollers, one equipped with spiral knives and the other covered with rubber. This way the remaining fat and flesh is removed.

Finishing

The finishing of the leather is intended to accomplish several things:

Protect the grain surface and give added abrasion and wear resistance.
Render the surface cleanable.
Uniformly level the color all over the hide.
Cover defects such as scars, tick bites and other imperfections.
Create different looks and effects from shiny glazed to matte, two-toned, waxy, as well as different grains and textures.

Splitting

Hides can be split at this stage or after they have been tanned. The decision is made by the technicians based on the characteristics that must be achieved on the final product. The skins are inserted through a machine equipped with two cylinders in between which a sharp running blade is kept constantly sharp. The skins are horizontally split to a predetermined thickness evenly throughout the surface. The top layer also called Top Grain is then ready for tanning.

Shaving & Trimming

All the unusable parts of the leather hides are trimmed off and the hides are run through a machine which shaves the back of it to a uniform thickness with tolerances of a tenth of a millimeter.

Pressing & Printing

During this mechanical operation, hides are run through a press, which imprints a texture grain onto the surface of the leather. This is done for aesthetic reasons and to hide defects and imperfections.

Tanning

Tanning is the main process where the skins or raw hides are preserved and converted into leather. It is a chemical treatment and although several methods can be used, the two main ones for upholstery leather are chrome tanning and vegetable tanning.

In Chrome tanning, the hides are treated with basic chromium salts. This process yields a light blue color leather which can accommodate a wide range of colors when dyed. Small amounts of other chemical might be used during the tanning process, but the function of these are to assist the tanning process by the chromium salts. Vegetable tanning is carried out by treating the hides with water extracts of various plants or trees. It is difficult to obtained dyed colors which do not change with exposure to light on vegetable tanned leather, but a vegetable tan leather generally possesses an enhanced grain pattern and esthetic properties that tend to be very good. Some vegetable tanned leather tends to be susceptible to acid vapors in the atmosphere and can slowly deteriorate in strength on exposure.

Dyeing

The tanned hides are loaded into large wooden vessels which are filled with water, fats, resins and dyes of various color. The colored leather is then ready to be dried.

Drying

Hides are dried in controlled temperature and humidity, and slightly stretched in the process so that they remain supple.

Staking

This is a mechanical operation where the hides are put through a machine equipped with a pin wheel which will soften the leather.

Quality Control

Every lot is carefully inspected for color match, hand, size and defects before it is sent to the next stage.

Quality Selection

Every hide is carefully selected and hand trimmed to eliminate all the unusable parts around the edges and to make sure it meets all the customer's requirements.

Measuring & Packing

Every hide is run through an electronic machine which accurately measures the surface of the hide. Measurement can be achieved in either square feet or square meters. Hides are then packed in boxes or palletized and shipped to the final destination.

Leather Types

Pure - Aniline

Pure Aniline is without a doubt one of the softest leathers to the touch, it is produced from the finest selection of raw hides. Dyeing takes place in large wooden drums where the hides are bathed until the desired color is achieved. The natural surface of these hides remains unaltered, and their structure is easily recognized.

Pure aniline leather presents some disadvantages when compared to other finished leathers, its light resistance is very poor, it has excessive elasticity and it is susceptible to stains and marks.

Numerous pure aniline hides undergo a waterproof treatment that does not improve in any way its resistance to light and elasticity. With these treatments stains can be avoided, but the leather must be cleaned immediately after any spill.


Pure Aniline

Semi - Aniline

This leather is produced from the finest raw hides. It is fully aniline dyed in drums. Then the leather is slightly covered with organic pigment which makes the dyeing more uniform and increases its resistance to wear, resistance to light and resistance to stain.

A major challenge in the production of semi aniline leathers is to produce a highly resistant product maintaining as much as possible the suppleness and feel of pure aniline.


Semi Aniline

Corrected Grain

This leather is produced from a lower selection of hides that are aniline dyed and machine buffed to remove the defects and imperfections from the surface layer. After being heavily coated with pigments a replacement grain must be embossed to recreate their natural appearance and look.

This product is highly resistant to wear, highly resistant to light and highly resistant to stain. It can be cleaned from stains quite easily, although it is always recommended to clean any spill or stain as soon as they occur.


Corrected Grain

Suede Split

Suede is produced from the under layer of the hide that has been split. The split side is aniline dyed and buffed to create the typical velvety effect.

Suede splits are not only used in upholstery, but also in shoes, garment and handbag industries.


Suede Split

Natural Characteristics

Veins| Neck wrinkles | Fire Brand | Scars

The life of a herd is eventful, which can also be a danger for the skin of the animal; let's think about the brands as well as scratches caused by the barbed wire, wounds and abrasions.

The traces of these experiences left on the leather are not, therefore, defects but they are in fact the proof that we are in front of a completely natural product.

Leather is a substance which keeps its properties unchanged for many many years, but it must be looked with care: it must be kept far from strong heat sources, sheltered from direct sunlight, and protected from water.


Suede Split

Finished Leathers

GOODS PRODUCTS

TESTIMONIALS

Latha alexander


PM Leathers is trust worthy and quality wise perfect. They always full fill my requirement how i am expects.

Soma sekar


very good quality with proper tanning.

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